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Every year, the week of July 4th brings a lot of occasions for celebration, for those of us who celebrate Independence Day in the USA. The “Declaration of Independence” is perhaps a unique document, in that the founders of the USA drafted a document, declared their Independence, and then proceeded to fight for it. It wasn’t until many years after that declaration, that freedom, was actually achieved. And then began the long road of actually building a nation, with this new-found, hard-fought for, freedom.

For those of you who are walking the spiritual path with an earnest practice, the above paragraph perhaps reminds you of a phase in your life, when you had to make a decision – to declare, and then, wage the battle for your spiritual independence. For some, this declaration comes in the form of a gradual awakening – for others, it may come in an instant, like a flash of lightning that illuminates the entirety of a dark forest. As we move forward on our declared path, we may become aware of the possibility of true spiritual freedom – a growing awareness of change. As our engagement with silence, with writing, with journaling, with meditation or the like increases, we may have moments where our hearts and spirits feel truly uplifted – a sense of freedom.

Spiritually awakened (or enlightened) “masters” describe spiritual freedom as being in a constant state of awareness of three elements – sat or truth, chitta or (higher) consciousness, and ananda or joy. Our awareness may move in and out of these three states, but to be constantly in a combination of these three states, sounds like a venerable state of freedom to me. However, I sometimes pause and wonder. What kind of responsibilities will this state of higher freedom bring for me? And will I attain this state of freedom until I am ready for those responsibilities? What kind of preparation and practice will I need, before the state of Sat-Chitta-Ananda unveils itself? Or am I already

I presented one definition of spiritual freedom in the preceding paragraph. What is your definition of spiritual freedom? Do you feel that there is a link between our level of spiritual freedom and our willingness to accept responsibility at said level? And what about the other side of the coin of responsibility – the word that can often weigh on our spirit – Duty. How do we balance freedom, responsibility and duty?

If you have read this far, and would like to discuss more on this subject of freedom and responsibility, do join us in our weekly twitter conversation in #SpiritChat – Sunday, June 7th at 9amET.

May our paths take us towards meaningful freedom – Namaste.

Kumud